Lean Glossary

Do you speak lean?

Yes, you can – with Lean Glossar.

5S
The basis for continuous improvement

Clean and tidy desks and offices are the foundation of further improvements. What is more, they make a lasting impression on customers.

The abbreviation 5S stands for the five steps to achieve regularity and cleanliness in the workplace:
1. sort out
2. set in order
3. shine
4. standardize
5. sustain and improve

Advantages gained from 5S:

  • increase efficency
  • greater employee satisfaction
  • greater transparency
  • basis of quality of work / products produces
  • improvements in health and safety

Our experienced consultants will be happy to help you implement the 5S or organize 5S workshops.

Auto-unloading (Hanedashi)

The term auto-unloading means that each machine must eject the workpiece automatically so that the machine operator must only load the machine.

Also see > Chaku-Chaku Line

Autonomation (Jidoka)

Autonomation is a made-up word which is composed of the terms „automatic“ and „autonomous“. It is rather a basic operation principle than a method or tool. Each machine or tool shall be able to operate without being permanently monitored by the machine operator and shall stop self-dependently in case of failure, such as a broken tool, so that no defect parts are forwarded to the following process.

Autonomation is one of the basic pillars of the production system at Toyota. It is also called "intelligent" automation because in contrast to full automation, not the quantity produced is of priority but quality and the ability of self-operation.

Benefits resulting from autonomation:

  • The production of defect parts is prevented
  • The machine operator may monitor several machines
  • In contrast to full automation, production systems remain flexible
Cardboard-Engineering
Design, optimisation and simulation of team working systems

Successful methods are not only intelligent but also, and more importantly, simple. Cardboard Engineering redesigns teamwork systems in the form of a “cardboard model’ and simulates and examines working processes. In the course of a 3 to 5-day intensive workshop, all participants use their creativity to achieve huge improvements in workplace design, ergonomics and best point material as well as tool supply.

Advantages gained from Cardboard-Engineering:

  • simulation and testing of new solutions live in 3D
  • optimal ergonomic and best point design
  • prevention of duplication of work due to intensive optimization processes and resource adjustments
Chaku-Chaku Line

The literal translation of Chaku-Chaku is „load-load” and is used as a fixed term for a lean manufacturing cell which incorporates several characteristics. The most important ones are the operation of several machines and highly standardised movements of the body and the hand in order to achieve a continuous and safe workflow. Each machine in the cell has an LCIA-type ejector so that the employees must only accomplish the activity of “loading the workpiece”.

Benefits resulting from Chaku-Chaku:

  • Increase of the productivity of employees
  • Continuous and safe workflow as well as improved working ergonomics
  • Easier adjustment to the modified value stream compared to complete  automation
CIP
Continuous Improvement Process
Continuous Improvement Process
Permanent improvement and creative renewal of processes in all sectors of the company

Continuous improvement in the company can be carried out on various levels and thus requires a range of platforms. We distinguish the following categories:

Employee CIP
for 'minor' problems and ideas

QCD workshops
for 'medium-scale' improvements (able to be implemented within
12 weeks max.), established and implemented in the course of one or
more workshops

Project management
for 'large-scale' improvements in the company which require more than 6
months work and therefore appropriate cost, deadline and resource
management

Advantages obtained from CIP:

  • enthusiastic and motivated staff
  • professional imptovement management as a driving force on the road to a „Lean Enterprise“
  • Measurable and long-lasting results and success
Employee qualification
The strategic goal – an investment in the future

The qualification of your employees requires time, costs money and must be carefully planned. Yet continuous professional training of company staff is the No. 1 tool for achieving and consolidating the company’s competitive advantage.

In the course of projects or seminars we analyse the direction that companies, sectors and jobs are taking. We discover your employees’ skills and set out areas for growth and development along with measures to be implemented – all this together with experienced consultants, using topics and methods suited to practical use. Current findings and experience will be transferred to meet the needs of your company.

Advantages of employee qualification:

  • enhusiastic and motivated staff
  • lower level of absenteeism
  • grater knowledge base
Heijunka
Production levelling (Heijunka)

In contrast to the classic approaches of production planning, the priority of Heijunka is not combining production lots but achieving a constant production rhythm. This is obtained by a clever combination and the “bit-by-bit” placement of production orders. This helps to avoid a too high or too low efficiency of a production system.

Heijunka must be applied very carefully in combination with other methods because there is a conflict of goals with just-in-time production.

Benefits resulting from Heijunka:

  • Increased quantity produced
  • Improved quality
  • Improved production flow and thus improved processing time
Kanban
Delivery oriented towards consumption

’Kanban’ is Japanese and means sheet of paper or (index) card. Ordering parts and materials through Kanban is a “pull” mechanism in the process chain (the pull principle). Working on the basis that “whatever’s gone must be replaced!” a Kanban card signals when supplies have reached a critical level and new material has to be ordered/supplied.

This ensures that the right materials are in the right place at the right time. The Kanban system guarantees smooth operation without the need for a large inventory.

The Kanban principle can be used in all areas of a company, from administration to manufacturing.

Advantages gained from Kanban:

  • smaller inventory
  • improved response to production demands
  • greater transparency
  • discharged subsidiary departments
LCIA
Low Cost Intelligent Automation

Low Cost Intelligent Automation is primarily applied in assembly, mechanical processing and in-plant transport.

Low Cost Intelligent Automation describes for example mechanical appliances which are mounted to existing production facilities and which are used for simple operations such as the transport of parts or the ejection of work pieces. In this process, an already existing movement (e.g. the opening of the cover of a lathe) is coupled by means of a lever mechanism in order to accomplish another movement (e.g. the ejection of a work piece).

LCIA is superior to full automation because production facilities may be rearranged and newly combined according to different value streams in a much easier way.

Benefits resulting from Low Cost Intelligent Automation:

  • Increased quantity produced
  • Improved quality
  • Improved production flow and thus improved processing time
Lighthouse
Lighthouse

The lighthouse is an area of a business which, through the implementation of lean methods, processes and structures, is as close as possible to the ideal state. This area becomes a publicly visible example for the company wide implementation; setting the direction, demonstrating possibilities and therefore creating the basis for a successful roll-out.

Milkrun

Milkrun is used as a term for the description of a certain logistic concept. The trick in this connection is to increase the supply frequency without increasing freight costs. This is achieved with the following strategy: The goods are not supplied from each supplier to the customer on radiating individual tours but each truck coming from suppliers who are involved in Milkrun delivers a part of the delivery in a closed "traffic circle".

Please absolutely note: The traditional Milkrun for delivering fresh milk to households works the same way, only with opposite roles. In the sense of the logistic concept, the households are the suppliers and the customer is the milk producer.

Benefits resulting from Milkrun:

  • Same freight costs despite increased delivery frequency and smaller partial deliveries
  • Reduced stock in goods receipt and thus reduced handling expenses
  • Increased inventory turnover
Objectives
Orientation and Control

The qualification of your employees requires time, costs money and must be carefully planned. Yet continuous professional training of company staff is the No. 1 approach to achieve and consolidate the company’s competitive advantage.

In the course of projects or seminars we analyse the direction that companies, sectors and jobs are taking. We discover your employees’ skills and set out areas for growth and development along with measures to be implemented – all this in association with experienced consultants, using topics and methods suited to practical use. Current findings and experience will be transferred to meet the needs of your company.

When establishing objectives, the following rules apply:

  • link company interests to those of the management
  • raise staff understanding for the targets set and inspire them to lend their support
  • integrate a 'leading by objectives' approach into company structures and processes

Advantages of Objectives:

  • joint decisions on targets and directions
  • improvements in results-oriented cooperation
One-piece-flow
Reduction of throughput time by optimising 'flow' in manufacturing

One-piece-flow is a means of drastically reducing production throughput time.
A production process on the one-piece-flow principle (optimised flow in manufacturing) involves components passing directly from one machine to the next (the most extreme form of throughput time reduction). Parts are always transferred individually. This is only possible in closely-linked operational processes. An adaptation of operational processes to “one-piece-flow” is therefore only possible after a careful examination of available capacity.

Advantages of one-piece-flow:

  • high level of transparency in working processes
  • earliest possible recognition of defects
  • short throughput times
  • reduction of work in progress
PDCA
acronym of:
Plan - Do - Check - Act

The specific sourcing in case of occurring problems is the key for success in solving these problems. For this process, a number of structured troubleshooting technologies are available which help employees to promote and implement solutions systematically and well directed. The PDCA method applies many of such methods and tools, e.g. cause-and-effect diagram, Pareto analysis, mind mapping.

The PDCA cycle consists of 4 phases:

  • Plan – planning phase
  • Do – implementation phase
  • Check – check efficiency
  • Act - standardise

For the purpose of continuous improvement, the PDCA cycle is usually repeated

Benefits resulting from the PDCA cycle

  • Systematic and specific troubleshooting
  • Application of approved troubleshooting techniques and tools
  • Improvement of processes
Poka Yoke
Avoidance of inadvertent errors

The Japanese expression ’Poka Yoke’ stands for the ’avoidance of lapses’. Poka Yoke thus means using simple and failsafe mechanisms to avoid incorrect installation, mistakes and mix-ups or the supply of faulty components.
Processes to ensure stability and quality begin long before production starts; simple Poka Yoke measures can therefore be used to guarantee quality as early as in the construction and planning phase.

Poka Yoke is used to avoid:

  • missing out / forgetting steps
  • processing / operationg mistakes
  • faulty / missing components
  • installation / set-up errors

Advantages gained from Poka Yoke:

  • fewer errors
  • easy for employees to familiarise themeselves
Production levelling (Heijunka)

In contrast to the classic approaches of production planning, the priority of Heijunka is not combining production lots but achieving a constant production rhythm. This is obtained by a clever combination and the “bit-by-bit” placement of production orders. This helps to avoid a too high or too low efficiency of a production system.

Heijunka must be applied very carefully in combination with other methods because there is a conflict of goals with just-in-time production.

Benefits resulting from Heijunka:

  • Increased quantity produced
  • Improved quality
  • Improved production flow and thus improved processing time
Project management
For major planned changes

Project management is a way of processing complex tasks/projects in a structured manner using:

  • clear organisation of planning with well-defined tasks, competencies and responsibilities
  • clear organisation of operations with well-defined tools and aids

Advantages of project management:

  • controlled and efficient implementation of major changes within a company
  • constant transparency concerning costs and deadlines
  • professional cooperation between sectors and departments

The aim of project management is to manage “large-scale” changes within a company in a clear and organised manner. The projects covered are tasks with a defined goal and limits in terms of time, cost and personnel. These projects are clearly differentiated from other plans and have project-specific organisational structures. 

Regular communication
Efficient and effective exchange of information

Efficient handling of company processes demands that all relevant information is in the right place at the right time, and of an appropriate quality. Standardised regular communication is one tool which can be used to this end.

Superiors and staff meet on a regular basis to exchange information, an exchange which is prompt, target-oriented and specifically focussed on individual areas and situations. This standardised communication process, introduced across the board, creates motivation, enthusiasm, a positive working environment and increases employees’ identification with their company. 

Advantages of regular communication:

  • all employees informed quickly and in a target-oriented manner
  • greater staff involvement
  • higher identification of employees with their company
Regularity and cleanliness
Basis for waste and loss minimized processes

Regularity and cleanliness form the basis for excellent quality, waste minimisation and continuous improvement. A clean and organised environment where everything has its proper place is vitally important: it not only motivates employees and improves their quality awareness, but also helps avoid losing time, effort and expense involved in unnecessary searches and handling. The “5 step” system - sort, set in order, shine, standardise, sustain - can be used to create an appropriate working environment. Regularity and cleanliness are proof of improved quality and the basis for a continuous improvement process.

Advantages gained from regularity and cleanliness:

  • increased transparency
  • promotes employee self-disciplie
  • basis of quality of work / products produced
  • increased customer trust
Set-up time reduction
Smaller batches, lower stocks and more flexibility for your company demands fast, professional set-up procedures

Not only do set-up times not contribute to a company’s value creation, they also constitute waste - and waste should be eliminated. Set-up time reduction is a step on the road to continuous improvement in changeover times.
“Speedier set-ups” increase the availability of machines, but far more important is their role in reducing batch sizes. This means that batch sizes must be adapted after every reduction in set-up time. In an ideal world, the changeover from one product to another would happen within minutes (i.e. in under 10 minutes: “single minute exchange of die” (SMED).

Advantages gained from reducing set-up times:

  • greater flexibility in the use of personnel and machines and thus faster response to production demands
  • reduction in batch sizes and work in progress
  • avoidance of overproduction
  • shorter throughput times 
SFM
acronym of:
Shopfloor Management
Shop Floor Management

Logical execution and implementation of managerial duties at the value creation site

Continual changes and process improvements require management comprehension and a management system that provides employees with sustainable support in their daily work, in the recognition of the necessity for action and the setting of priorities. The manager should shape these spheres as coach within a learning organisation on site and realise these with best practice standards.

Management comprehension in shop floor management is based on a logical coaching process along the value creation chain in the factory. Furthermore, it is based on standardised lean projects, which are carried out by management staff and employees. Processes and their indicators (KPI) are described in transparent form, with spheres of activity and problems defined, prioritised and worked through in a structured manner.

The current visualisation of a few concise indicators is important:

  • the short-cycle measurement of quantities
  • the short-cycle measurement of quality
  • the occupancy of positions with employees
  • process control and structured problem-solving
  • other KPIs and accompanying measures if necessary

Advantages and benefits of shop floor management

  • Shorter response times
  • Sustainable and structured problem solving
  • Optimum use of resources
  • Optimised and more durable processes
  • Efficient planning and control
  • Graphic evaluation of optimisation potential and results
  • Increased transparency of target/actual status and their trends
  • More efficient communication
  • Increased self-discipline in the teams
SMED
Single Minute Exchange of Die

Set-up time reduction

Smaller batches, lower stocks and more flexibility for your company demands fast, professional set-up procedures  

Not only do set-up times not contribute to a company’s value creation, they also constitute waste - and waste should be eliminated. Set-up time reduction is a step on the road to continuous improvement in changeover times.   

“Speedier set-ups” increase the availability of machines, but far more important is their role in reducing batch sizes. This means that batch sizes must be adapted after every reduction in set-up time.  

In an ideal world, the changeover from one product to another would happen within minutes (i.e. in under 10 minutes: “single minute exchange of die” (SMED)).

Advantages gained from reducing set-up times:

  • greater flexibility in the use of personnel and machines and thus faster
  • response to production demands
  • reduction in batch sizes and work in progress
  • avoidance of overproduction
  • shorter throughput times
Standardization
Clarity and understanding of working processes

Standards set out the standardised manner in which various processes and operations are carried out.
 
Standardization helps ensure optimal results, consistent quality with a consistent and optimal use of resources, irrespective of who is working them, up to the moment a better solution is found.
 
Standards which are documented and visualised make it possible to present systems transparently and thus meet the criteria for audits and improvements.

Advantages of standardization:

  • increased transparency
  • promotes employee self-disciplie
  • basis of quality of work / products produced
  • increased customer trust
Supermarket

Supermarket is the term for an instrument which controls production self-dependently. The supermarket is a centrally located place for semi-finished products in manufacturing. Only after the downstream process has taken parts from the supermarket, production is accomplished in an upstream process using a defined quantity of items.

Attention: Such as Kanban, the supermarket is also a ‘necessary evil' and is only applied if it is not possible to connect different working stations or manufacturing lines using one-piece-flow.

Benefits resulting from supermarkets:

  • Simple means for the demand-oriented control of production
  • Avoidance of surplus production because it is only possible to produce as long a ‘compartment’ is available in the shelves of the supermarket
TPM
Total Productive Maintenance

You cannot avoid the wear of equipment. It is the task of maintenance to recognise wear during the whole lifespan of machines / equipment, to reduce it and to compensate its impacts.

TPM as total productive maintenance or self-dependent maintenance is a standardised and supporting method if you want to increase machine availability in the medium to long term and if you want to reduce unplanned idleness during production processes to a minimum.

The target is to make the machine operator responsible for his machine / equipment and to confer routine maintenance work to him. TPM provides the basis by means of measures for optimising serviceability, maintainability, access and the easy setting up of machines and equipment.

Benefits resulting from TPM

  • Improvement of the working situation on-site
  • Improvement of the availability of machines and equipment
  • Visualisation of deviations
TQM
Total Quality Management
Visual Management
Transparency of targets, measures and status

Visual management helps to provide staff with all necessary information quickly, clearly and efficiently. The company vision, goals and strategy in particular can be communicated visually to the entire company. This helps to ensure that all employees are working towards the same goals.

Visual management is not limited to company targets: it should be used in each sector and department, right down to individual offices and desks. Only well-informed members of staff are able to work on joint company targets.

Advantages of visual management:

  • transparency throughout the company
  • new employees able to adjust more quickly
  • employees better informed and therefore more motivated
  • avoidance of communication errors
  • support for leadership
Waste busting using video analysis
Waste-busting using video analysis: analyse working processes quickly and efficiently in a team, recognise potential for rationalisation and develop ways of avoiding waste.

Video analysis is an important tool in establishing the optimisation potential in time-critical production processes. The first step is to prepare a video of the production process in MPEG2 format. The entire production process can then be split up and classified in individual sequences. The results will be displayed in graphics showing the optimisation potential.

Advantages gained from video analysis:

  • a more realistic, tangible and better documented production process
  • detailed classification and separation of various aspects of work, exact to the second
  • a basis for discussion on an exact and consistent definition to evaluate aspects of work (create value - do not create value - necessary / superfluous additional work - optimisation of set-up time)
  • graphic interpretation of the optimisation potential
  • documentation and availability of the analysis

Our website uses cookies.
Please note that page www.staufen.pl uses information stored by cookies. Use of our webpage without changing the settings, means that they will be stored in memory of your device. More about that in section Staufen and protection of personal data. Close